Falling In Love With The Sunrise

When there is a change in routine within the family it can take some adjusting. I’ve written in the past about writing Morning Pages, and over the Summer holidays, not only did I break my habit,  it actually fell in to pieces.  Strangely, I found that my sleep quality was hugely compromised also – there are many reasons I can find for this, but I still wonder if because my daily ‘unload on to the page’ wasn’t happening any more, I was carrying around peripheral ‘stuff’, and so may be it was interfering with my sleep.

I’ll never know. But I did recognise that I needed to get back to writing my Morning Pages, not just for my wellbeing, but also for my writing. Daily writing is good for honing my craft; it’s important that I keep practising.

What I found when I tried to go back to it was that the new routine for 2017, which consists of three different morning start times because of sessional kindergarten, meant that I’d always run out of time to sit down and do them. I chatted to my husband about it and he is an early riser. He leaves for work before seven, but he gets up extra early to meditate. We decided a few tweaks to our morning routine would help give me the time to write.

The voice of reason that he is, he showed me that the only solution was to get up earlier – like he does for his meditation. I now have my cup of tea at 6.00 am, and I have 20 minutes to ease into the morning. As much as I didn’t want to get up any earlier, I knew he was right and that if I was committed to this practise it was only me who could make time for it. I’ve barely missed a day since I made this new commitment. Sleep quality is slowly getting better.

The happy result of committing to writing every morning (apart from actually writing every morning) is that most days I am up before the sun comes up. I never used to see the sun rise.

There is something so magical about seeing the sun rise.

Even if it not that spectacular, it is still a marvel. The stillness and serenity leave me feeling calm and optimistic. Now I understand how our bodies were once so attuned to the waning of the moon and movement of the sun. While largely that has been interfered with because of our modern lifestyles, there is something innate that helps you move though the day when you witness the natural beginning of the day; the literal new day dawning.

Mother nature has particularly spoilt me these past few weeks and I have found myself outside in my dressing gown with my camera, (probably looking a little like a crazy lady!) experimenting with the changing light. Here are a few of the sunrises I’ve been part of.

I live opposite a golf course so I was delighted to capture the dawn players in the distance.

One morning, the light changed dramatically when the clouds came over and  everything was bathed in a golden light. It was quite magical!

This was taken from the back yard, when I realised it was going to rain I dashed out the back to pull the clothes off the line; the light was awe-inspiring.

The other lovely thing about seeing the sun rise and taking photos is that I have started to play around with my camera a bit more. Here are a couple of shots from a recent bush walk we went on.

  

My son spotted this overgrown mushroom (toadstool?) hidden under the grass. I feel a bit like I’ve been hiding under that dark mushroom, having missed almost a life time of sun rises.

I’ve fallen in love with the sunrise – it’s been a revelation!

How about you – has anything surprised you lately?

Exploring: Making An Ordinary Life Less Ordinary

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On the road to Adelaide

In the past month I have been lucky enough to visit two capital cities in Australia – Sydney and Adelaide, and a few places in between. I love to travel but having three small children makes it harder. Having said that, it is getting easier – hence the Sydney and Adelaide trips.

Going to new places sparks something in the imagination. It refreshes and energises.  Hanging out somewhere that you don’t normally go makes you see things differently; look at things in a new way.

Here are a few things that I saw, and some of the thoughts that this tripping around triggered.

Let’s Abandon The Beige

In Sydney I was fortunate enough to attend the Frida Kahlo & Diego Rivera exhibition  (which has been extended to October 23rd, by popular demand, so if you get a chance to go, it really is worthwhile). Looking at Frida Kahlo’s work got me thinking about her; her beauty, her exuberance, her talent. It made me wonder why women today (including me) are so set on making ourselves disappear. We are the greys, blacks and beige – we choose those colours, and variations of them to represent and express ourselves. Frida reminded me to bring back the colour – abandon the grey scale, abandon the beige.

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There is only one you, there is only one me – we have only one life. We must show ourselves. Colour is a way to do it.

Art Is Everywhere If You Care To Look

I was also lucky enough to view the Archibald Prize exhibition, and the Telling Tales – Excursions in Narrative Form exhibition  at the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia. Being a writer, of course, I am deeply interested in story telling and alternative and unique ways to do it.

Often personal stories are complex and not at all linear. We are are used to straight forward story telling but modern art challenges this: it can be the perfect channel for these meandering, non-linear, but deeply moving tales.  Here is one of the installations from the Telling Tales exhibition that appealed to me both aesthetically and narratively.

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Emily Floyd, It’s because I talk too much that I do nothing 2002

But you don’t need to seek it out, it’s in the streets, public places, and in nature.

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Sign to the ‘Cave Gardens’ in Mt Gambier

We followed the sign to the Cave Gardens and this is what we found!

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It Is Worth Creating A Monument To Someone You Love

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On the way to Adelaide we stopped in a cute country town, called Smythesdale, to stretch our legs and grab a coffee. I encountered this beautiful bench seat when the others had gone to use the loo. I saw it in the distance and was so intrigued by this beautiful seat, standing alone on a grassy verge, painted in maroon-red, that I went to investigate. Beautifully ornate, it also had a plaque that said ‘Joyce’s Seat’. I thought this was so lovely.

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I don’t know who Joyce was. I’ve tried to find out since I’ve been home. But have turned up nothing. I should have asked the lady who made the coffee; but I also quite like not knowing. I like the idea that Joyce is who ever I want her to be. But also, she must have had an impact on someone, for them to buy her a gorgeous seat and put her name on it. Joyce must have been some kind of lady. Whoever organised that seat for Joyce must have loved her and by creating that place to sit, Joyce remains. She touches strangers, like me, if only for a moment, when we take a rest on her very inviting seat, or wonder for a while, who she might have been.

I love the idea that without these little trips of exploration I wouldn’t have experienced these enriching moments, thought processes or things of beauty. Exploring the world enriches my life in monumental ways, that are really the small ways. Going to see some art, moseying down the street, stopping to stretch your legs – ordinary things making life extraordinary, in small ordinary ways.

 

What about you? Have you seen something ordinary, that was extraordinary?

What I learnt From A Walk In the Rain

DSC_0015Yesterday, for the first time in what feels like forever, the sun came out. It came out and it shined down on us all day. We were all tricked by the winter, loaded up with coats, scarves and jumpers. Then found ourselves peeling off layers, not even the breeze was cold. People were smiling rather than gritting their teeth against the bite of the air. The boys playing footy were leaping around, having fun, rather than turning purple from cold. Mother nature never fails to surprise and delight. [Read more…]